Robert Sidney/Sonnet 21

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Sonnet 21 (““Alas why say you I am ritch? when I...” / “Alas, why say you I am rich? When...”)
автор Robert Sidney (1563—1626)
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Original text:


Sonnet. 21

Alas why say you I am ritch? when I
doe begg, and begging scant a lyfe sustaine:
why doe you say that I am well?— when paine
lowder than on the rack, in mee doth cry.

O let mee know myself! my poverty
with whitening rotten walls, no stay doth gaine,
and these small hopes you tell, keep but in vaine
lyfe with hott drinks, in one layd down to dy.

If in my face, my wants and sores so greate
doe not appeer: A canker (think) unseen
the appleer heart, thogh sownd without doth eate;

Or if on mee from my fayre heaven are seen
some scattred beams: Know sutch heate gives theyr light
as frosty mornings Sun: as Moonshine night.

1590s-1600s

Contemporary text:


Sonnet 21

Alas, why say you I am rich? when I
Do beg, and begging scant a life sustain.
Why do you say that I am well?— when pain
Louder than on the rack, in me doth cry.

O let me know myself! My poverty
With whitening rotten walls no stay doth gain,
And these small hopes you tell, keep but in vain
Life with hot drinks, in one laid down to die.

If in my face my wants and sores so great
Do not appear, a canker (think) unseen
The apple's heart, though sound without, doth eat;

Or if on me from my fair heaven are seen
Some scattered beams, know such heat gives their light
As frosty morning's sun, as moonshine night.

1590s-1600s


Notes


См. также / See also